Success Grows Here

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Text-Only Transcript

Dean Scott Angle: Agriculture is the largest industry in the State of Georgia. It generates about $80 billion of economic value; that’s almost 10% of the total economy of the state. It also produces nearly 400,000 jobs for the state. It’s also the fastest growing industry in Georgia. And that’s why UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is so important to our future.  That’s because over the past several decades, it’s become clear that business follows innovation. And that’s especially true with agribusiness. The innovative work we’re doing here is paving the way for the future. And at the forefront are world-renowned UGA faculty members, leading our research and teaching our students – very impressive students, I might add. This year’s freshman class set new records in terms of academic standards for both GPA and SAT scores. So they’re truly poised to become a stellar workforce of leaders and innovators for Georgia, ready to tackle the complex challenges of the future. To that end, these scientists and students are performing cutting edge work across a wide array of agricultural disciplines, from plant breeding to animal cloning, food safety and packaging to environmental impact technologies that help conserve and protect our soil and water. And our UGA extension agents are a key part of the process, literally taking this innovative work from our labs to the farmers in the fields. You can see this for example in the work we’re doing with variable rate irrigation in Georgia’s Lower Flynt River Basin, where we’ve increased agricultural water efficiency by up to 20%. This is a huge benefit not only in terms of conserving water, but we’re simultaneously increasing crop yields. And of course this is related to the growing field of Precision Farming, where we’re developing technology such as drones to help detect crop stand issues earlier in the planting season than ever before. Additionally, we’re working with the Trans-Atlantic Precision Agriculture Consortium, an organization that not only invites student exchange with other agricultural colleges across the Southeast, but also with universities throughout Europe, so that we can take advantage of technology being developed around the world and bring it back to the people of Georgia. That’s why it’s so important to me, personally, to get out across the state, to talk to our agricultural leaders, our farmers, our students; ensuring that the technology and solutions we’re developing will meet our ever-increasing agricultural demands.

Crowd: Gooooo Dawgs! Sic ‘em! Woof! Woof! Woof! Woof!

Dean Scott Angle: And I’m proud to say that we’re able to do that, thanks in large part to our legislators, our amazing alumni who continue to do so much for the college, Georgia’s business community and everyone who supports UGA’s College of Agriculture. I don’t hesitate for a second to say that the University of Georgia’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences is one of the very best in the country but the amazing thing is it’s only getting better.

Descriptive Text

The video opens to the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences logo with the words “Success Grows Here” underneath it.

The video moves from a cotton harvester in a field to a split screen of a black cow and a female looking through a microscope to a slide with the words “10% of the economy of Georgia” above a 3-way split screen of a field.

The video changes from Dean Scott Angle talking to a sped up clip of students coming in and out of a building to a 3-way split screen of a business slide, a professor talking in a classroom and a professor pointing to a graph on a computer screen.

The video continues to a 3-way split screen of peanuts, a farmer walking and a caged chicken with the words “And that’s especially true with” above the split and the word “Agribusiness” below the split.

The video moves from a split screen of a small 4-propellered drone with cameras and a microscope to a 3-way split screen of the Ag Hill monument, a professor and 2 students at a microscope and 2 researchers looking into a microscope.

The video changes from a sped up clip of students coming in and out of the Poultry Science building to students walking on a shaded paved sidewalk to words streaming over a UGA Today web shot.

The video continues from a professor showing students a lizard in an outdoor class to a split screen of streaming words and a video clip of 2 students wear red “Teach Ag” shirts.

The video moves from a 3-way split screen of a campus sign, a female milking a cow and a female in a laboratory to 2 students and a professor working on an experiment in a lab to a female pouring liquid nitrogen into a container.

The video changes from a 4-way split screen of plants and pigs to 2 men looking at packaged meat to a 4-way split screen of 4 girls with signs, a garden of Swiss chard, a researcher collecting a water sample and a male installing a water system in a flower garden.

The video continues from a split screen of land and water with the words “Conserve and protect our soil and water” over it to a 3-way split screen of people walking, sitting and talking to the UGA Extension logo.

The video moves from a 4-way split screen of a portable irrigation system and a field to 3 people standing in a field to the sprinkler running and showing a rainbow to a split screen of the spigot and a field with the irrigation system running.

The video changes from 2 men looking at the portable irrigation system to a shot of a field with “20%” over it to a split screen of the irrigation system running and a row crop field.

The video continues from small 4-propellered drone with cameras flying to a 3-way split screen of the drone flying to a 3-way split screen of a male working on a drone, a tractor and 2 men sitting in a row crop field.

The video moves from a 3-way split screen of a small 4-propellered drone with cameras flying to a Trans-Atlantic Precision Agriculture Consortium logo with streaming agriculture photos below it.

The video changes from a 3-way split screen of a man in a field, 2 men in a lab, and female students in a class to a female examining a leaf to hands examining evergreen needles and a female working in a lab to students in an outdoor class.

The video continues from the Ag Hill monument to a split screen of Dean Angle speaking and photos of him meeting people to students working in a laboratory to a 3-way split screen of a portable irrigation system, a man doing a presentation, and a man making adjustments to electronic equipment.

The video moves from a split screen of a picnic and Dean Angle cheering to a split screen of Dean Angle talking with a man and the Georgia Capitol building to a 3-way split screen of CAESAR – the college’s mascot – taking pictures with Dean Angle and students.

The video changes from a close up of names on bricks to a 3-way split screen of a man talking, a microscope, and a CAES building/department sign to a 3-way split screen of a graduating student, kids holding a turtle, and Dean Angle talking to a group of men.

The video continues from Dean Angle talking to the CAES logo.

Video ends.

(c) 2014 University of Georgia
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Office of the Dean and Director